Making Reading Worthwhile...
5 Key Strategy Lessons

to Enhance Reading Activities, Skills, & Comprehension

Posted January 1, 2021 by Teacher Friendly

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It is not enough to simply teach children to read; we have to give them something worth reading. Something that will stretch their imaginations—something that will help them make sense of their own lives and encourage them to reach out toward people whose lives are quite different from their own. K. Paterson, children’s author

We can’t just tell our students how to read. But rather, we need to show them how. We need to model different reading strategies so they can learn them and apply them to reading. Modeling will allow students to observe a teacher’s thought processes. It will encourage the students to imitate what they see. So, how do we as teachers show our students how to read? How can modeling encourage the type of reading that K. Paterson speaks of? This article discusses 5 key strategies that do just that.

Strategy #1 Making Connections

  • “That reminds me of… Remember when… I see a connection between…”

Making connections is a reading strategy that helps readers gain a deeper understanding of the text by connecting it to their background knowledge and experiences. Teachers need to show students how a text connects to their own lives (text-to-self), to another text that they have read (text-to-text), and to the world around them (text-to-world). Through modeling and continued practice, the students will be able to make relevant connections to a text on their own. Since making connections involves thinking, the students will most likely be more engaged throughout the reading experience, which will fuel more excitement about reading.   

How to model: As you read a grade-level text out loud with the students, use the think-aloud strategy to show how to make each type of connection. Explain what the text reminds you of and how you can relate to it. Share another similar text; explain the differences from other texts. Then, share your thoughts on why this text reminds you of the real world – maybe something that can be generalized to people anywhere. Try to move beyond the surface-level connections so students can more vividly see authentic connections. Take enough time to ask the students to share examples, too. It’s quite easy to extend lessons on making connections in reading. Students can write their own text connections in a journal as they read any type of text and even expand on them in class discussions or essay writing.

Strategy #2 Questioning

  • “I wonder… How come… Why… I don’t get it when…”

Questioning helps kids search for answers as they read, build interest along the way, and become more capable readers. As they question, their comprehension is monitored and they interact with the text to gain meaning. There is a real purpose to read.  It is important that children know that it is good to both ask questions and to search for answers throughout the reading process. They need to know that these two actions (asking questions and searching for answers) help build understanding and interest in what is being read. Questioning inevitably fosters wanting to read and learn more.

How to model: As you read a text with the students, write any questions you have on sticky notes by the specific passages. Include questions you have before, during, and after reading. Show students that:

  • You are activating prior knowledge and making predictions before you read.
  • During reading you deal more with self-questioning and questioning the text or the author.
  • After reading the text, you offer critical analysis and explore the unanswered questions.

Talk to the students about the types of questions you wrote. Show them your questions. Explain why you are asking these questions and why you want to know the answers. The students will see that some of the questions had concrete answers and could be answered from parts of the text; others could not be answered. Encourage your students to write questions on sticky notes as they read, too. Make this a habit. Then have the students see if their questions were answered.  If not, how can they find the answers?

Strategy #3 Visualizing and Inferring

  • “I can see it… The picture in my mind looks like… I visualized… I think… Maybe it means… This is   what I predict…”

When we visualize, we create pictures in our minds based on prior knowledge and our experiences of what the text is about. For example, we might all read the same text but imagine the characters, the setting, the actual events in a different way. Similarly, for non-fiction text, we may also see things differently based on how we visualize the text. And when we infer, we take the visuals in the text (e.g., illustrations, photographs, graphics, and text organizers) and make an educated guess about what is happening or what they might mean. Both strategies help strengthen comprehension and bring a richer experience to reading.

How to model: Before reading, look at the visuals with the students and predict what might happen or what the text is about. Look at the cover and back cover and gather ideas. Then, look at the text itself. Talk about the characters (expository) or the events (non-fiction), share background information, predict happenings, etc.

 Strategy #4 Determining Importance in Text

  • “This is important because… The text cue tells me it is important because…”

Students need to be taught what is important when they read. They need to be shown how to sift and sort through information and decide what to remember (main ideas and topics) and what can be tossed aside (extraneous details). Students need to understand the impact of text length and structure, headings and subheadings, the first and last lines of a paragraph, illustrations and photographs, and graphics and text organizers. They also need to be taught text structures: cause and effect, problem and solution, question and answer, comparison and contrast, and description and list/sequence so they understand the intent of the text and can grasp the important elements.  

How to model: Throughout the reading, show the students how the text is organized. Look at what the author includes in the text and how much text is written about a particular person, event, idea, etc. See what catches your attention: different font sizes, spacing, visuals. Re-read several paragraphs to determine the main idea. Show the students that the topic sentence is usually first in a paragraph and a summarizing sentence is at the end. Finally, if students are shown different text structures and their characteristics, they will transfer this knowledge to new texts. So, for example, if they know that a text is written to show cause and effect, this helps them establish the meaning of the text. And from this meaning, they can better determine what is important.  

Strategy #5 Synthesizing Information

  • “I get it… Oh, yes, this is why… In summary…”

Synthesizing is the process of taking many different sources and bringing them together into one cohesive thought. It often brings in a new idea or theory. This reading strategy combines summarizing, making connections, and making predictions. Synthesizing encourages kids to pause their reading and to reflect; they combine their previous thoughts with new information to form new ideas.  

How to model: As you read, share your thoughts on how you view a particular character, the plot, or the topic. As you read more, add to your thoughts. In the end, discuss if your thoughts changed, and if so, how, when, and why they changed. Invite kids to do the same.

Utilizing reading strategies helps strengthen reading activities, skills, and comprehension. The end result is that reading becomes much more worthwhile for students.

You can learn more about teaching reading and how to apply concrete strategies to make reading worthwhile for your students, ignite a passion for literacy, sharpen your teaching skills–and at the same time, earn graduate-level semester credit. Teacher Friendly offers a variety of professional development courses that are designed for educators to further their professional growth in a variety of classroom and educational settings.These professional development courses are an excellent opportunity to add to your teaching skills, develop professionally, and enable you to earn credit for salary advancement and/or recertification requirements.

Published by: www. teacherfriendly.com.

Self-Created Time-Log Sample

Document all the time you spend creating and implementing lesson plans, curriculum, activities, projects, strategies, or techniques inspired by what you learned. Creating your own log gives you the freedom to document all the time and effort you have dedicated to completing your coursework requirements. Your log must be specific and include dates and accomplishments. For each graduate-level credit/unit, you must document 15 hours of academic involvement. 

Date Objective & Goals Times Hours
4/21
Created new curriculum & lessons for upcoming semester
9:00 am - 3:00 pm
6
4/23
Developed new learning activity for my curriculum/lesson plan
7:00 am - 9:00 am
2
4/27
Created PowerPoint/video presentation incorporating new strategies
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
2
5/2
Reviewed workshop materials and wrote draft for reflection paper
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
2
5/3
Developed new learning activity for lecture
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
1.5
5/6
Typed 3-page reflection paper discussing new lesson (first credit)
6:00 am - 7:30 am
1.5
Total hours of involvement/participation must meet 15 hours per credit
15

It may be that you require more or less time completing your own personal activities and/or projects, and that’s why we have left it to you to decide how you manage your time. 

*The log above is only a sample. Specific course guidelines and requirements will be provided upon course enrollment. 

 

©2021 The Mosaic Project. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

2 credits = 6-page reflection paper

3 credits = 9-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you will create and implement into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing a training, webinar or seminar. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/Power Point presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target–grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards (or your state standards) set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated/will evaluate the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use/will you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

©2020 Fluency Matters. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Self-Created Time Log Sample

Document all the time you spend completing an Echoes & Reflections webinar/workshop, as well as time spent creating lesson plans, curriculum, activities, projects, strategies, or techniques inspired by what you learned. Creating your own log gives you the freedom of documenting all the time and effort you have dedicated to completing your coursework requirements. Your log must be specific and include dates and accomplishments. For each graduate-level credit, you will document 15 hours worth of academic involvement. All your coursework participation must be away from professionally paid hours.

Date Objective & Goals Times Hours
4/21
Completed Echoes & Reflections Online Course/Webinar
9:00 am - 3:00 pm
6
4/23
Developed new learning activity for my curriculum/lesson plan
7:00 am - 9:00 am
2
4/27
Created powerpoint/video presentation to discuss Holocaust impact
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
2
5/2
Incorporated Echoes & Reflections strategies into new lesson plan for classroom project
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
2
5/3
Developed new lesson plan materials and content
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
1.5
5/6
Typed 3 page reflection paper discussing new lesson (first credit)
6:00 am - 7:30 am
1.5
Total hours of involvement/participation must meet 15 hours per credit
15

It may be that you require more or less time completing your own personal activities and/or projects, and that’s why we have left it to you to decide how you manage your time. 

 

©2020 UOP Affiliate. Echoes & Reflections. All rights reserved.

Self-Created Time Log Sample

Document all the time you spend creating and implementing lesson plans, curriculum, activities, projects, strategies, or techniques inspired by what you learned. Creating your own log gives you the freedom of documenting all the time and effort you have dedicated to completing your coursework requirements. Your log must be specific and include dates and accomplishments. For each graduate-level credit, you will document 15 hours of academic involvement. All your coursework participation must be away from professionally paid hours.

Sample Time Log

Date Objective & Goals Times Hours
4/21
Created new curriculum & lessons for upcoming semester
9:00 am - 3:00 pm
6
4/23
Developed new learning activity for my curriculum/lesson plan
7:00 am - 9:00 am
2
4/27
Created powerpoint/video presentation incorporating new strategies
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
2
5/2
Reviewed workshop materials and wrote draft for reflection paper
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
2
5/3
Developed new learning activity for lecture
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
1.5
5/6
Typed 3 page reflection paper discussing new lesson (first credit)
6:00 am - 7:30 am
1.5
Total hours of involvement/participation must meet 15 hours per credit
15

It may be that you require more or less time to complete own personal activities and/or projects, and that’s why we have left it to you to decide how you manage your time. 

*The log above is only a sample. Specific course guidelines and requirements will be provided upon course enrollment. 

 

©2020 UOP Affiliate. Teacher Friendly. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

2 credits = 6-page reflection paper

3 credits = 9-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you have created and implemented into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing a professional development workshop, conference, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/Power Point presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target (grade level, type of class, groups):
Define the needs and goals of the learners for whom you designed these ideas for, and describe how they might correlate to your learners specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future implementation of the projects?

*Additional course guidelines, formatting requirements, and information will be provided upon course enrollment.

©2020 UOP Affiliate. Teacher Friendly. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

Type a 3-page, single-spaced reflection paper describing in detail your professional development with Echoes & Reflections. Be creative with your writing and try to incorporate the key points below into the structure of your paper:

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing a professional development workshop, conference, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/power point presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target: grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards set by for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

*Additional course guidelines, formatting requirements, and information will be provided upon course enrollment.

©2020 UOP Affiliate. Teacher Friendly. All rights reserved.

Self-Created Time-Log Sample

Document all the time you spend creating and implementing lesson plans, curriculum, activities, projects, strategies, or techniques inspired by what you learned. Creating your own log gives you the freedom to document all the time and effort you have dedicated to completing your coursework requirements. Your log must be specific and include dates and accomplishments. For each graduate-level credit/unit, you must document 15 hours of academic involvement. All your coursework participation must be away from professionally paid hours and after completion of an SAVVAS Learning Company conference, course, workshop or webinar.

Date Objective & Goals Times Hours
4/21
Created new curriculum & lessons for upcoming semester
9:00 am - 3:00 pm
6
4/23
Developed new learning activity for my curriculum/lesson plan
7:00 am - 9:00 am
2
4/27
Created PowerPoint/video presentation incorporating new strategies
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
2
5/2
Reviewed workshop materials and wrote draft for reflection paper
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
2
5/3
Developed new learning activity for lecture
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
1.5
5/6
Typed 3-page reflection paper discussing new lesson (first credit)
6:00 am - 7:30 am
1.5
Total hours of involvement/participation must meet 15 hours per credit
15

It may be that you require more or less time completing your own personal activities and/or projects, and that’s why we have left it to you to decide how you manage your time. 

 

©2020 SAVVAS Learning. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3 page reflection paper

2 credits = 6 page reflection paper

3 credits = 9 page reflection paper

4 credits = 12 page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you will create and implement into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing the professional development workshop, conference, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/Power Point presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target–grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards (or your state standards) set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated/will evaluate the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use/will you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

©2020 SAVVAS Learning Company. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

2 credits = 6-page reflection paper

3 credits = 9-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you will create and implement into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing the professional development workshop, conference, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/PowerPoint presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target–grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards (or your state standards) set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated/will evaluate the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use/will you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

©2021 Practical Ideas for Educators. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Self-Created Time Log Sample

Document all the time you spend writing your reflection papers, viewing video sessions, creating and implementing lesson plans, curriculum, activities, projects, strategies, or techniques inspired by what you learned. Creating your own log gives you the freedom of documenting all the time and effort you have dedicated to completing your coursework requirements. Your log must be specific and include dates and accomplishments. For each graduate-level credit, you will document 15 hours of academic involvement. All your coursework participation must be away from professionally paid hours.

Date Objective & Goals Times Hours
4/21
Created new curriculum & lessons based on session
9:00 am - 3:00 pm
6
4/23
Developed new learning activity for my curriculum/lesson plan
7:00 am - 9:00 am
2
4/27
Created powerpoint/video presentation incorporating new strategies
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
2
5/2
Reviewed session materials and wrote summary
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
2
5/3
Developed new learning activity for lecuture
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
1.5
5/6
Wrote 3-page reflection paper for first credit
6:00 am - 7:30 am
1.5
Total hours of involvement/participation must meet 15 hours per credit
15

It may be that you require more or less time completing your own personal activities and/or projects, and that’s why we have left it to you to decide how you manage your time. 

Suggested activities and projects to help you earn credit:

Development or revision of classroom curriculum, rubrics, lesson plans, educational games, learning activities, PowerPoint presentations, video presentations, worksheets, educational websites, classroom visuals, classroom assignments and projects, bulletin boards, learning centers, anchor charts, assessments, teacher-created books, physical education activities, self-evaluation/reflection reports, technology-related activities, storytelling activities, units of study, etc.

 

 

Designed for busy teachers like you, you will get up to 6 months to complete your coursework requirements, and extensions are always granted if you needed. The projects you choose to develop will ultimately demonstrate the application of time you invest in professional development experiences, such as research, videos, readings, etc. An additional expectation is to complete a time log that documents the time spent for this course. The specific requirements concerning your chosen projects and the time log are dependent what resonates most with you and how many credits you take per course. 

 

 

©2021 Fluency Matters. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

2 credits = 6-page reflection paper

3 credits = 9-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you will create and implement into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing the professional development workshop, conference, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/PowerPoint presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target–grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards (or your state standards) set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated/will evaluate the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use/will you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

©2020 The Mosaic Project. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you will create and implement into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing the professional development workshop, conference, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/Power Point presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target–grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards (or your state standards) set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated/will evaluate the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use/will you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

©2021 The Comprehensible Classroom. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Self-Created Time-Log Sample

Document all the time you spend creating and implementing lesson plans, curriculum, activities, projects, strategies, or techniques inspired by what you learned. Creating your own log gives you the freedom to document all the time and effort you have dedicated to completing your coursework requirements. Your log must be specific and include dates and accomplishments. For each graduate-level credit/unit, you must document 15 hours of academic involvement. All your coursework participation must be away from professionally paid hours.

Date Objective & Goals Times Hours
4/21
Created new curriculum & lessons for upcoming semester
9:00 am - 3:00 pm
6
4/23
Developed new learning activity for my curriculum/lesson plan
7:00 am - 9:00 am
2
4/27
Created PowerPoint/video presentation incorporating new strategies
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
2
5/2
Reviewed workshop materials and wrote draft for reflection paper
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
2
5/3
Developed new learning activity for lecture
3:15 pm - 4:45 pm
1.5
5/6
Typed 3-page reflection paper discussing new lesson (first credit)
6:00 am - 7:30 am
1.5
Total hours of involvement/participation must meet 15 hours per credit
15

It may be that you require more or less time completing your own personal activities and/or projects, and that’s why we have left it to you to decide how you manage your time. 

©2021 The Comprehensible Classroom. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

2 credits = 6-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your reflection paper.  

OPTION A: Try to answer the following questions in your paper:

ACQUISITION

      • What does it mean to be proficient in a language?
      • How are languages acquired?
      • What is the developmental order of language and what are the implications for the language classroom?
      • What does it mean to be comprehensible and comprehended in a world language class, and why is it relevant? 
      • What new ideas are you thinking about as a result of this week’s videos and materials?
      • What ideas resonated with your previous teaching experience?  

COMPREHENSION

      • What are key skills in being comprehensible/comprehended? 
      • What one skill would you like to focus on?
      • How will you focus on it?
      • Reflect: how did it go?  
      • What new ideas are you thinking about as a result of this week’s videos and materials?
      • What ideas resonated with your previous teaching experience?  

INSTRUCTION

  • What instructional strategies (MovieTalk, Card Talk, Story Ask, etc.) have you used before to connect with your student’s lives and remain comprehensible?  
  • Is there anything you would like to change about your approach to these?
  • What one new strategy would you like to implement as a result of this training? 
  • Reflect: how did it go?  
  • What new ideas are you thinking about as a result of this week’s videos and materials?
  • What ideas resonated with your previous teaching experience?   

ASSESSMENT

  • What are some reasons to grade for mastery? 
  • What do grades do (or not do)? What do grades measure?
  • What are some challenges for you in implementing mastery based grading? 
  • What are the advantages of mastery based grading? 
  • Are there assessments that you use that are already proficiency-based performance assessments? 
  • Are there changes you can make to existing assessments to align them with proficiency based performance?  
  • What new ideas are you thinking about as a result of this week’s videos and materials?
  • What ideas resonated with your previous teaching experience?

OPTION B: 

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation: 

Describe the activity, strategy, or technique that you developed as a result of completing your professional development experience (workshop, webinar, class or training). Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction. 

Population target: grade level, type of class, groups: 

Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc. 

Objectives and goals: 

Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the mastery outcomes recommended.  

Evaluation methods utilized: 

Describe how you evaluated the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions: 

Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects? 

©2021 The Comprehensible Classroom. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

2 credits = 6-page reflection paper

3 credits = 9-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you will create and implement into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing the professional development course, workshop, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/Power Point presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target–grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards (or your state standards) set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated/will evaluate the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use/will you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

©2020 Learning Workshop. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

2 credits = 6-page reflection paper

3 credits = 9-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you will create and implement into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing the professional development course, workshop, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/Power Point presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target–grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards (or your state standards) set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated/will evaluate the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use/will you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

©2021 Step by Step Workshops. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

2 credits = 6-page reflection paper

3 credits = 9-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you will create and implement into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing the professional development course, workshop, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/Power Point presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target–grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards (or your state standards) set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated/will evaluate the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use/will you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

©2021 Terry Waltz. UOP Affiliate. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3-page reflection paper

2 credits = 6-page reflection paper

3 credits = 9-page reflection paper

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. The reflection paper will demonstrate your professional development by describing in detail the projects you will create and implement into your educational setting. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the lesson plan, activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed and implemented (or plan to implement) as a result of completing the professional development course, workshop, webinar, etc. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, video/Power Point presentations, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target–grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards (or your state standards) set for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated/will evaluate the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use/will you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

©2021 The Creativity Workshop. All rights reserved.

Overview of Reflection Paper Requirements

1 credit = 3 pages

2 credits = 6 pages

3 credits = 9 pages

Each graduate-level credit requires a 3-page, typed, single-spaced reflection paper. Try to incorporate the following key points into the structure of your report.

Activities, projects, strategies, or techniques of implementation:
Describe the activity, project, strategy, or technique that you developed as a result of completing a Yoga 4 Classrooms workshop, webinar, live webcast or online course. Be sure to include materials and resources utilized. For example, handouts, Y4C Activity Card Decks, visual aids, props, books, learning strategies, etc. Detail why you chose this idea and how it fits into your professional development needs or those of your learners. Explain the actual process of introducing your project and the methods used for instruction.

Population target: grade level, type of class, groups:
Define the needs and goals of the learners that you designed these ideas for and how they might correlate to their specific needs and/or core objectives. Indicate if these learning methods were designed for special need students, specific groups within a class, developmental ages, etc.

Objectives and goals:
Describe the specific targeted learning objectives and how they related to the goals of your instructional program. Try to correlate the objectives/goals to the specific activity/project you presented. Possibly correlate, when appropriate, the objectives/goals with the Common Core Standards set by for your curriculum.

Evaluation methods utilized:
Describe how you evaluated the success of the projects you developed. What methods or criteria did you use to assess your achievement of specific goals? 

Overall outcomes and reactions:
Include your personal assessments of how the learning objectives and goals were achieved. What were the reactions of your learners? How would you redesign or change the methods utilized with future utilization of the projects?

*Additional course guidelines, formatting requirements, and information will be provided upon course enrollment.

©2020 UOP Affiliate. Yoga 4 Classrooms. All rights reserved.

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